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Child Relocation Laws in Illinois

Whether it be for a new career, a remarriage or even the desire to get to a specific school district, moving a child’s primary residence has serious legal complications if not carried out properly. 

Divorces and separations can be emotionally overwhelming. Especially when a child is involved. Disputes regarding child custody (parenting time), child support or even where the child will live can easily arise between parents. Even if these specific issues have been resolved by an Illinois court order, other problems can arise quickly. Here’s a look at the Child Relocation Laws in Illinois and how Masters Law Group can help.

Parental Responsibilities in Illinois

With today’s economy, many parents are discovering that they need to move great distances in order to find work – sometimes across state lines. Before a parent can remove a child from Illinois they must seek approval from the court, even if they are the primary parent.

Currently under Illinois Law, a child is governed by Section 609.2 of the IMDMA (Illinois Marriage and Dissolution of Marriage Act). This IMDMA indicates when a parent is looking to move with their child or children, they must seek court approval, since a parent’s relocation is a substantial change for the child. 

If you move out of state, and the other parent files a parental responsibilities case in Illinois within 6 months, you will probably have to come to Illinois to participate in the case, or you might have to return your child to Illinois. You can move with your child if there is no court case involving your child and:

  • You and the other parent are married or are in a civil union
  • You are the natural mother and the child has lived with you for more than 6 months

Relocation Inside and Outside of Illinois

There are a couple things to note when you’re considering relocating. Relocating in terms of Child Relocation Law, means to move more than 25-50 miles away from the child’s original home if it is in Cook, DuPage, McHenry, Kane, Lake, or Will Counties or if the new home is out of state. 

After you ask the court for permission to relocate, you’ll have a hearing where the court will decide if relocating is in the child’s best interests. The court is going to look at many things, primarily the quality of each parent’s relationship with the child, to the reason why the parents would be relocating. Here are a couple other things the court will consider:

  • Educational opportunities available in each location
  • The arrangements for parental responsibilities
  • Impact on the child, and the wishes of the child

If you are relocating with your child, you must follow these steps. 

  • File a Notice of Relocation, and give a copy to the other parent at least 60 days before your planned relocation. If the other parent agrees and signs your notice, you can file the signed notice with the court and move without going to court any further. 
  • The court will also change your current parenting plan or parental responsibilities order to allow the move. 
  • If the other parent doesn’t agree or doesn’t sign the notice, then you must ask the court for permission to relocate. You would then file a Petition to Relocate.

Summary

It is important to keep your current parenting plan or parental responsibilities up to date so if you do look to relocate, the process of following said steps above are made easier for you and your loved ones. It can unfortunately become complicated and require much interaction between the parents and the court. It’s in your best interests to hire an experienced attorney if you need assistance with Child Relocation Law.

Hiring Child Relocation Legal Help

Hiring an attorney highly experienced in family law will help you understand your legal options and create a plan for what comes next. Masters Law Group LLC focuses on helping clients assert their rights to further the best interests of their children. We help clients put aside their grief and educate them about their options in child allocation of parental responsibilities.

We represent individuals in both their initial quest to set a parenting time schedule, as well as parents looking to modify a previously determined schedule. If you require a review of your current parenting time schedule or parenting plan, contact us here today to schedule a consultation.

Can Your Ex-Spouse Just Move Away with The Kids?

Is your ex-spouse trying to move away with your children? One of the most difficult parts of a divorce is seeing your children less, and if your spouse moves away, it could make that even more difficult. Luckily, with the help of a Chicago family and divorce law firm, we can help prevent this from happening. 

Here are some factors that could affect the outcome if your ex-spouse wants to move your children away.

The custody arrangement

Now called Parenting Time, the child custody arrangement will affect whether or not your ex can move with your children. If you have partial custody, it’s unlikely that they can legally move far away. If you don’t have partial custody, and only have regular visits, there’s still a good chance the courts will not allow them to.

What is the distance of the move?

In several states, there is a specified range in which an ex-spouse can move with your children without at least giving notice. Typically, it must be within 50-100 miles.

Did they give formal notice?

Oftentimes, your ex-spouse must give a formal notice prior to moving. It should be in the form of a legal document and should include the destination, why they’re moving and a visitation plan. It should also be given at least 60 days before the move date.

Relocation trial

You have 30 days to object to the move when your ex-spouse proposes it, which will then result in a relocation trial. In most states, the courts treat staying in the same location as the norm, so your ex’s lawyers will have to be the ones arguing for the move. They will have to prove that the relocation is in your childrens’ best interests. There aren’t specific rules for these situations, so judges generally make different decisions case by case. The primary factors looked at by the courts include:

  • Custody arrangements
  • The distance of the move
  • The motivation of both parties
  • What is in the childrens’ best interest

Getting Professional Advice from Masters Law Group

At Masters Law Group, we specialize in all family law related matters and focus on helping clients assert their rights to further the best interest of their children.

We offer a wide range of services tailored to our clients’ unique legal needs and have a depth of knowledge, experience and talent in the Family Law and Divorce field.

If your ex-spouse is proposing to move away with your kids, we can help. Contact us to schedule your consultation here today. 

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PARENTING TIME SERVICES WITH MASTERS LAW-GROUP

Whether to hire a lawyer or navigate child custody solo is one of the first considerations for parents who are petitioning the court for child custody.

Parenting Time of your child is a very emotional law topic. Parenting Time rights may be determined by the agreement of the parties or by a court order.

Masters Law Group represents individuals in both their initial quest to set a parenting time schedule, as well as parents looking to modify a previously determined schedule. Learn more and set up a consultation with us here today.

Illinois Child Custody Basics: Allocation of Parental Responsibilities

Legally speaking, the term “child custody” is now called “parental responsibilities“. This includes parenting time and decision-making power. If you live in Illinois and are engaged in a custody battle for your child, you should know the basic rules and be able identify specific factors that courts consider in making custody decisions.

In a divorce proceeding, determining who will have residential custody of a child can be the most emotionally difficult part of the entire process. If you are a parent who is considering ending your marriage, you probably have concerns about how you and your ex-spouse will share responsibility of your child/children. Some couples are able to come to a custody agreement between themselves, however for many, couples require legal and court intervention.

FACTS ABOUT ALLOCATION OF PARENTAL RESPONSIBILITIES AND GUARDIANSHIP

There are three basic types of child allocation of parental responsibilities in Illinois — joint allocation of parental responsibilities, sole allocation of parental responsibilities and shared allocation of parental responsibilities:

Joint allocation of parental responsibilities requires parents to cooperate in decision-making regarding education, health care and religious instruction. It does not mean that the children live with each parent for an equal amount of time. The parties will agree or the court will assign a residential parent. The non-residential parent will pay child support and exercise parenting time. The amount of time the children spends with the non-residential parent is addressed in a parenting time agreement or order.

Sole allocation of parental responsibilities is the term that describes the arrangement that gives one parent the responsibility for deciding everything related to the child’s welfare. It does not mean that the other parent is out of the picture. Parenting Time and parenting time can be the same in a sole allocation of parental responsibilities case as it is in a joint allocation of parental responsibilities case.

Shared allocation of parental responsibilities is a form of joint allocation of parental responsibilities. It is appropriate when the child spends equal time with each parent, the parents reside in the same school district and are able to joint parent.

ILLINOIS-SPECIFIC LAWS

Illinois law encourages the “maximum involvement and cooperation of both parents regarding the physical, mental, moral, and emotional wellbeing of their child.” However, if the parents appear unable to agree on decisions about the major aspects of a child’s upbringing, the court is must decide how to allocate each of these responsibilities.

Illinois allocation of parental responsibility laws stipulate that children 14 and older may choose which parent to live with, but the judge may overrule this decision if he or she determines the child’s decision is not in his or her best interests. A parenting plan generally recognizes the following:

  • The continuity of the parent-child relationship typically is in the child’s best interest.
  • The needs of children change and grow as they mature.
  • Custodial parents make daily decisions (including emergencies) while child is with that particular parent.
  • Both parents are to have access to a child’s official records

Parenting responsibility plans also identify how children spend birthdays and other holidays (plus iron out details such as transportation arrangements, when supervision is required and other considerations.)

The newest changes made to Illinois child custody law were made back in 2016.  Highlights of those changes include:

  • As mentioned above, “custody” and “visitation” have been replaced with “allocation of parenting time and responsibilities” to describe when each parent is responsible for the child and what those responsibilities entail during that time.
  • The terms “joint decision-making” and “sole decision-making” have been added to describe whether one or both parents must make decisions about education, religion, medical care and extra-curricular activities.
  • A court order is required for the custodial parent to move more than 25 miles from their current location if they live in the Chicago metropolitan area.  If the residence is outside of the metropolitan area, a court order is required for a move greater than 50 miles.

GETTING STARTED

Beginning the allocation of parental responsibilities process can vary from county to county, but in general, this the steps to follow include:

  1. Familiarize yourself with your county’s rules. Consider seeking legal representation.
  2. File a petition. The petition may be submitted independently or as part of a divorce, separation, order of protection or parentage case. You must file all forms electronically, unless you have been granted an exemption.
  3. Notify the other parent you are asking for a certain amount of parental responsibilities. To do this, you must serve them a “summons” along with the filed petition. The server may be a sheriff’s deputy, a private process server, a private investigator or — with permission from the court — an adult with no relation to the case.
  4. Wait to hear from the other parent. The other parent has 30 days to respond.  If the parent does not respond, ask the court for a default judgment.
  5. File a parenting plan. Each parent has 120 days from the initial filing to submit a proposed parenting plan. These plans help the judge make custody decisions.

Masters Law Group LLC focuses on helping clients assert their rights to further the best interests of their children. We help clients put aside their grief and educate them about their options in child allocation of parental responsibilities.

If you are in the midst of a dispute regarding the allocation of parental responsibilities, contact our experienced attorneys here today.

5 Reasons to Hire a Family Law Attorney

While Illinois has no law requiring you hire a family law attorney in a family law case, there are good reasons why working with an experienced professional is in your best interest. 

Divorce, divorce mediation, child custody, parental responsibilities, domestic abuse. These (and more) are all daunting cases for any individual having to face them, especially because these sensitive subjects of law involves loved ones. To manage emotions and avoid a complicated legal process, hiring an experienced family law attorney could be extremely advantageous.

Here are five reasons to work with a legal professional in your Illinois family law case.

Objectivity

As an “outsider”, a family law attorney can be much more objective about your case than yourself, and/or family and friends. Especially when experiencing a highly complex issue and emotions are running high. Having a family law attorney in your corner means that you have a professional who can offer objective, fact- and experience-based advice regarding your divorce. A family law attorney can help you avoid going for a quick resolution that leaves you at a long-term financial or parenting disadvantage.

Legal Protection

From bullying-tactics, “I’m taking everything from you.” to unlawful threats “You’ll never see the kids again.” – It’s hard for anyone to know the legalities behind battling a family law case when they’re experiencing it for the first time. An experienced attorney however, is well aware of the law and experienced in outcomes of similar cases.

In addition, for cases involving domestic abuse, you can have an attorney help you observe the precautions you need to follow to keep you and your children safe, such as orders of protection.

Family Law and Legal Proceedings Knowledge

There’s a lot of red tape and substantial paperwork when it comes to family law proceedings. And that’s before it goes to trial. This alone can be especially overwhelming if you’re trying to go it alone. If you haven’t prepared the correct paperwork, the judge could exclude any – or all – of the paper work presented to him/her. By hiring a family law attorney, you can rest assured the correct paperwork is submitted at the correct time. Consequently, you will not have to sweat about your case being thrown out as early as possible.

Court Experience

If a trial becomes necessary, a family law attorney can avidly represent you in court and work toward achieving the best possible jury verdict in your favor. Experienced attorneys can make sure that their client is prepared for everything that is going to happen when they enter the room, and will know exactly how to handle any particular situation that arises during the pendency of a family law case. This will keep the judge happy and the proceedings running smoothly and efficiently.

Peace of Mind

Ultimately, one of the best benefits of hiring a family law attorney to represent your interests in a case is the fact that you will be able to trust your legal issues are being duly dealt with. Whenever you have an issue or a family matter that requires legal representation, it’s essential to seek the assistance of a knowledgeable and experienced professional.

Legal issues around family law are incredibly emotional and time consuming, and your attorney will take a great deal of stress off your plate. Your attorney will also provide peace of mind by reassuring you that your case is in experienced, capable hands.

Family Law with Masters Law Group

If you are facing a family law issue, contact the family law attorneys at Masters Law Group. Located in Chicago, Illinois, the firm handles family law matters in Cook County and surrounding counties. Masters Law Group concentrates in area of domestic relations, which includes divorce, allocation of parental responsibilities, child support and related family matters.

We offer a wide range of services tailored to our clients’ unique legal needs. Masters Law Group LLC has a unique depth of knowledge, experience and talent in the Family Law and Divorce field. Click here to view our practice areas. And click here to set up a consultation today.